SOLAR FAQ

 

Enphase microinverter installation

Enphase microinverter installation

GENERAL SOLAR FAQs

1. What is a photovoltaic (PV) solar power system?
2. How does solar PV work?
3. What’s the difference between a solar PV system & a Solar Hot Water (SHW) system?
4. Which direction should my panels face?
5. Do the panels need to be pitched?
6. What size system do I need?
7. How many panels do I need?
8. How much roof space do I need?
9. What happens if my roof is shaded?
10. Is there enough sunlight for solar in Victoria?
11. What happens on a cloudy day?
12. How much energy will I generate in winter?
13. What happens at night?
14. What happens in a blackout?
15. What’s the difference between kW & kWh?
16. How many kWh does a typical household use?
17. Do I need batteries?
18. Should I wait for the technology to improve?
19. How much does a solar system weigh?
20. Can I monitor my system online?
21. How reliable is solar power?
22. Do solar panels ever generate enough electricity to cover the amount of energy used to manufacture them?

SOLAR FINANCIAL FAQs

23. How much does a system cost?
24. How much will I save on my electricity bills?
25. Can I zero my electricity bill?
26. What’s a feed in tariff?
27. Is there still a government rebate?
28. What are STCs?
29. Do I have to sell my STCs?
30. How long will it take for the system to pay for itself?
31. Does a solar system increase the value of my property?
32. How much is the deposit?
33. Are there finance options available?

SOLAR INSTALLATION FAQs

34. Do I need a permit to install a solar system?
35. Do we use Accredited Clean Energy Council designers and installers?
36. Do we use qualified electricians?
37. Do I need a new meter?
38. What happens after the system is installed?
39. Should I replace my roof material before I install solar?
40. Do I need to upgrade my switchboard?
41. How long does an installation take?
42. Do I need to get a connection pre-approval from the electricity distributor?

SOLAR – POST INSTALL FAQs

43. Can I upsize my system later?
44. How long does a system last?
45. What are the warranties?
46. Can I insure my solar system?
47. Does Green Energy Options organise the grid connection?
48. Who organises the government incentive paperwork?
49. Is any maintenance required?
50. How can I tell if my system is working properly?

SOLAR SYSTEM COMPONENT FAQs

51. Microinverters vs central string inverters. Which is better?
52. Where are the panels made?
53. What different types of panels are available?
54. Transformer vs transformerless inverters?
55. Where is the inverter located and what does it do?
56. What brand of panels do Green Energy Option use?
57. What inverter brands do Green Energy Options use?

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GENERAL SOLAR FAQs

1. What is a photovoltaic (PV) solar power system?

A Photovoltaic  solar system is an electricity generating system normally consists of a number of solar panels an inverter/s, some framing, electrical cabling and electricial protection devices. This is used by your home or business to help reduce the amount of electricity you buy, helping to minimise the cost of your bills and your greenhouse gas emissions.

2. How does solar PV system work?

The panels in a solar system contain cells made up of a semiconductor material that turns light into electricity. These panels generate a DC power that is turned into 240V AC electricity by an inverter or inverters. The inverter/s are then wired into your main switchboard or sub board, where the system delivers power to your property. Any electricity that isn’t used is then exported to the grid where it is sold and used by another property nearby.

3. What’s the difference between a solar PV system & a Solar Hot Water (SHW) system?

A solar PV system is a system that generates electricity from light. A Solar Hot Water system (SHW) uses the sun’s heat to preheat hot water and minimise the amount of electricity, gas or wood required to heat your hot water. These systems are totally separate from each other, but can contemplate each other well in a residential household.

4. Which direction should my panels face?

In the southern hemisphere, a fixed solar array will generate the most electricity if it is facing north. This isn’t the only option however and we will generally install panels East to NE, N, NW and West. There will be some overall losses in system output with these options (normally less than 15% loss), but not every property will have a perfect solar roof. In some cases it may be advantageous to face panels to the west for example, as this better matches the time of day when electricity is being used. South facing roofs can also be an option, but are normally a last resort. Green Energy Options can assess the cost and benefit of facing panels to the North, compared with adding more panels to an east facing roof for example.

5. Do the panels need to be pitched?

In Melbourne a North Facing roof, pitched at 30 degrees is about perfect for solar. In Victoria however, most pitched roofs are around 22 degrees. In this situation it is not normally worth spending extra money on tilt framing to negate a loss of 1-2%. It will generally be more cost effective to add extra panels to improve the system’s output. If you have a flat roof, the panels can either be laid flat, or a tilt frame can be used to achieve the optimal angle. We normally reccommend tilting to minimise dirt accumulating as water runoff won’t be as good if they are laid flat.

6. What size system do I need?

The solar system size you require will vary, depending on the size of your home, the number of people living in it, the appliances you have and the amount of electricity being used. Most residential systems installed these days are between 1.5kW and 5kW. There are smaller and larger systems options, but as a rule:

  • Small House                       1 person                  $250-350/qtr               1.5-2kW
  • Medium House                 2-3 people              $350-500/qtr               2.5-3.5kW
  • Large House                       3-5 people              $500-600/qtr              4-5kW
  • Extra Large House           5+ people               $600+/qtr                     5kW+

It will also depend on what you are hoping to achieve. Green Energy Options can assist with system sizing, just give us a call 1300 931 929.

7. How many panels do I need?

It will depend on the wattage of the panels that are being used. In residential and commercial applications most of the panels that are used will range from 180 Watts to 300 Watts.

So for example the REC panels that we use are 260W, 12 panels x 260W = 3120W or 3.12kW.

8. How much roof space do I need?

It will depend on the size of your system, for most systems, around seven square meters per kW of panels installed will cover it. Just remember the panels are rectangular and about 1.7m x 1m.

9. What happens if my roof is shaded?

If your roof has a small amount of shading, there may be some options for either avoiding the shade, trimming shading trees or compensating for the loss by installing an extra panel or two. Another alternative is to install a microinverter solar system, as these will help to minimise losses from direct shading. If your roof is heavily shaded there may not be a good solar solution for your home, however moat properties have options and ground mount framing can be an alternative.

10. Is there enough sunlight for solar in Victoria?

Victoria has plenty of sunlight hours to make solar power a worthwhile option. Germany is an example of a country with lower sunlight hours that has a large amount of solar installed and is now reaping the benefits.

11. What happens on a cloudy day?

Your solar system will still generate electricity on on overcast cloudy day. You will just find that the number of kWhs generated are lower.

With a grid connected solar system, any shortfall in generation from your solar system is automatically drawn from the grid, so your appliances will still run as normal.

12. How much energy will I generate in winter?

In winter there are less daylight hours and the number of sunny days we get are less. This leads to a reduced energy production. For example a 3kW system in Melbourne that might have a daily average of 11kWh/day over 12 months, in winter might only average 7-8kWh/day. The flip side is during the summer when you might see averages of 15kwh/day.

13. What happens at night?

With a grid connect solar system, you are still connected to the electricity grid, so when the sun goes down, any power required will automatically be drawn from the grid as normal.

14. What happens in a blackout?

Grid connected solar systems are required by law to turn off during a blackout when the grid goes down. All inverters approved for use in Australia are required to pass an anti-islanding test, where when they have sensed that a connection to the grid is lost, they turn off automatically. This is a safety feature designed to protect anyone working on the grid infrastructure from electrocuting themselves from an unwanted electrical feed in.

15. What’s the difference between kW & kWh?

Kilowatts (kW) are a unit of power. For example if we took ten 100W lightbulbs, their combined power rating would be 1000W or 1kW. This is an instantaneous reading of output at that time, just like a 1kW solar system working in optimal conditions would produce 1kW of power. Solar system sizes are normally talked about in kW, so the peak power rating of a system is used – eg 3kW system

Kilowatt hours (kWh) are a unit of energy and this is different from kW power. If you take those ten light bulbs and ran them for one hour 1kW x 1hr = 1kWh, and if you left them on for 3hrs 1kW x 3hr = 3kWh. As a general rule 1kW of solar panels installed on a north facing pitched roof in Melbourne, will average 3.6-4kWh/day over a 12 month period.

When looking at solar systems, the kWhrs generated by your system are probably more relevant to you than the kW power rating of your system, because this is what you can compare to your bill.

16. How many kWh does a typical household use?

You can see how many kWh you are using by looking on your electricity bill. There is normally a graph showing your usage in kWh or a total kWh used for the period.

The average Australian household is using around 18-20kWh p/day. If you have gas or are in a smaller home with less people the average will be lower. If you are in a large house with a bigger family this can be larger. Some homes may only use 3-5kWh/day, where others may be up at 30-40+kWhr/day.

As well as providing solar power solutions, Green Energy Options provides energy audits and action plans to help reduce your electricity consumption, give us a call on 1300 931 929 to find out more.

17. Do I need batteries?

Most grid connect solar systems currently being installed in Australia will not have batteries. Instead they use the grid as the backup to supply power to appliances overnight or in times of low sunlight. Batteries are expected to come down in price over the next few years and with new technologies emerging we will probably begin to see more grid connect solar systems with battery storage integration. Green Energy Options can also assist with Off grid solar enquiries, where you may not have access to the electricity grid, batteries can be a great way to utilise power overnight.

18. Should I wait for the technology to improve?

Every few months we see a TV or newspaper report about an exciting new solar technology that is going to change the world of solar, promising lower costs, better efficiencies and higher outputs. There is some fantastic work being done in the field of solar R&D, but most of these new technologies are in the early stages of development, printed solar cells, spray on solar roof materials and building integrated solar PV products may either be many years away from commercialisation or just very expensive. Just remember existing mono and poly-crystaline technology has been around for 30-50 years and is constantly being improved. Keeping production costs down and the stopping the degredation of photovoltaic material in a harsh environment are just a couple of obstacles new products will need to overcome.

We expect that there won’t be any “silver bullet” solutions  in the solar world, but instead we will see small improvements in space efficiency, energy generation and panel level optimisation like microinverters. If you hang around waiting too long for a new technology to come along, you might just miss out on the benefits solar could be giving you in the meantime.

19. How much does a solar system weigh?

The panels we use are 18-19kg each, if you work on another 2.5kg per square meter for the racking you’re looking at around 15kg/m2. For the standard house the weight is generally not a problem, however if you are concerned, we would recommend speaking with a structural engineer to confirm suitability.

20. Can I monitor my system online?

There are a number of different monitoring options available to keep track of your solar systems performance. SMA, Power-One and Enphase all have their own online monitoring solutions, which will show you historical data on how your system has been performing. There are also options for uploading system monitoring data directly to your computer. Alternatively we can offer a third party solution which shows on site consumption as well as solar production. Give us a call to find out more 1300 931 929.

21. How reliable is solar power?

Over 1 million Australian homes have now installed solar systems. Solar is now a mainstream energy solution for your home and a solar system should be as reliable, if not more reliable than your standard grid connection. Solar panels have no moving parts and good quality panels have life expectancies in excess of 25 years. A good quality inverter should last 10-15 years or more, but you can expect to replace the inverter at some stage in the life of the system.

22. Do solar panels ever generate enough electricity to cover the amount of energy used to manufacture them?

20 years ago, when production of solar modules was more energy intensive per module manufactured, the panels did take a while to generate enough electricity to payback the energy used to manufacture them. These days with mass production and improved efficencies in manufacturing processes, the average solar panel should generate enough electricity in it’s first year or two of life to pay back all the energy that went into manufacturing it. For more on this and energy payback for the whole system see our blog post here.

 

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SOLAR FINANCIAL FAQs

23. How much does a system cost?

There are a number of factors that will affect the cost of a solar system, the size, the roof layout, the type of panels and inverter you choose, site access and the difficulty of the cable run are a few.

Green Energy Options has systems starting from around $3,500 after the government incentive comes off. Most people are spending $5,000-$10,000 on a standard residential solar system. We can tailor a solution to your needs, just give us a call for a free consultation and quote 1300 931 9239.

24. How much will I save on my electricity bills?

There are a number of variables, when it comes to actual $$ savings on your electricity bill.

  • Firstly it will depend on the size system you have, obviously the bigger the solar system the bigger the savings.
  • Savings will also be effected by the price you are paying for electricity, in Victoria most people are paying around 30c/kWh, the higher the price the more you will save.
  • Depending on how much electricity you use and particularly how much you use during daylight hours, will have an effect on the savings you will see, the more solar energy you use directly from your system, the more you will save.
  • The feed in tariff (FIT) or the amount you are paid for energy exported into the grid is another factor.

For a 5kW system, there is potential to save up to $2,000 a year or more. And one great thing to remember is that as the price of electricity goes up, the amount you are saving also increases, so your solar system is going to be of more value to you as time goes on.

25. Can I zero my electricity bill?

It is possible to reduce your bill to $0. However, in Victoria the feed in tariff is less than what you pay for electricity, so you will need to export around five times more power during the day than what you are purchasing back from the electricity grid in the evening to break even. Unfortunately this generally means quite a large system in the range of 10-20kW (40-80 panels) and although it is sometimes achievable, you will normally find the financial outlay will mean it will be in excess of 10 years to recoup your money. Normally if you size your system to cover 1/4 to 3/4 of your bill your return on investment will be better.

26. What’s a feed in tariff?

A feed in tariff (FIT) is the amount that you are paid by your electricity retailer for electricity fed back into the grid through your meter. Victoria currently has a legislated minimum of 8c/kWh and this is what most retailers will pay.

27. Is there still a government rebate?

Yes, well sort of. Government rebates have changed a lot over the last seven years and there is often confusion as to what’s going on. The government currently has a scheme offering Renewable Energy Certificates (RECS or STCs) for solar power systems, these are not really a “rebate” as such, but are worth money and normally result in a discount off your solar system price at the point of sale.

28. What are STCs?

STCs are Small-scale Technology Certificates also referred to as RECs or Renewable Energy Certificates. These are part of the federal Government’s Renewable Energy Target (RET) which specifies 20% of Australia’s energy will come from renewable sources. Electricity companies are required to purchase a specified quota of the certificates, which represent renewable energy generation. So normally what happens is they are sold on to the electricity companies through a broker and this results in a discount at the point of sale off your system for you.

Green Energy Options normally manages all paperwork for STCs, to make the process as smooth as possible for our customers.

29. Do I have to sell my STCs?

You do not have to sell your STCs. There are options if you wish to pay for the solar system in full, process the paperwork and claim back the incentive yourself. Speak to us about the different options.

30. How long will it take for the system to pay for itself?

Most of the solar systems that we install have payback periods ranging from 4-8 years (note that this doesn’t include any potential value added to your property). There are a number of different factors effecting your payback, see 24. How much will I save on my electricity bills? for more info.

31. Does a solar system increase the value of my property?

Yes. There have been couple of studies done into this in the US. A study conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory found that an average system of 3.1kW added an average of $17,000 to the sale price of homes in California. Also a study by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) in 2011 found that investing in solar panels could increase the value of your home by up to 4%. This equates to 10’s of 1000’s of dollars and is comparable to adding another bedroom the study found. The great thing is the more people start to understand solar the more they want it and the more value is placed on homes with solar.

32. How much is the deposit?

The deposit amount is 10% deposit of the gross price of your solar system.

33. Are there finance options available?

If you are wanting to finance your solar system, there are a number of different options. Green Energy Options has a great blog post here giving you an idea of what’s available.

 

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SOLAR INSTALLATION FAQs

34. Do I need a permit to install a solar system?

In most cases you will not require a permit to install a solar power system. However, if you live in an area with a heritage overlay, there may be some restrictions and you will probably need to get a permit before installing a solar system. If you are unsure, we recommend contacting your local council for more info.

 

35. Do we use Accredited Clean Energy Council designers and installers?

All of our installations and system designs are done by Clean Energy Council accredited installers and designers.

 

36. Do we use qualified electricians?

All of our systems are installed and connected to the grid by qualified electricians.

37. Do I need a new meter?

In Victoria, most homes now have a smart meter. If this is the case you will probably not require your meter to be changed once a solar system is installed. The electricity distributor (ie Powercor) will recalibrate your meter for solar power. Note that the grid connection/meter costs can be up to $300-$400, this will be charged to you by the distributor through your next electricity bill.

 

38. What happens after the system is installed?

Once we install your system, there is an electrical safety inspection completed by an independent inspector (this cost is covered in our system price). We will then organise your paperwork to be sent off to your electricity retailer, who will then forward the details of grid connection through to your electricity distributor, who will organise your official grid connection.

Green Energy Options also organise the STC incentive paperwork and will visit you for a final handover, complete with user manual and all documentation about your system and the installation.

39. Should I replace my roof material before I install solar?

If your roof is old and you are looking at doing work in the next couple of years, we would recommend replacing the roof material before you install solar panels. The panels can be uninstalled removed and the reinstalled on the new roof, but this can end up being a more costly option.

40. Do I need to upgrade my switchboard?

Green Energy Options can provide advice around whether your switchboard needs upgrading. We offer a free home consultation, where we assess any additional works that may be required. In most cases the current switchboard will be fine, however in circumstances where the switchboard is old or ceramic fuses are installed, we would recommend an upgrade. This can be done at the same time as the installation to save on costs, or alternatively you can organise yourself.

Give us a call on 1300 931 872 for a free onsite consultation.

41. How long does an installation take?

A standard residential installation will take between half a day to two days, depending on the roof access, layout, system size and weather.

42. Do I need to get a connection pre-approval from the electricity distributor?

For installations in Powercor & Citipower distribution areas, pre-approval is required for all solar systems. Normally this will take 1-3 weeks to get approved. Most systems applied for are approved as applied for, however if you are in a rural area, with limited infrastructure or if there are a number of solar systems already connected to your transformer on the street, there may be system limitations. As a general rule, a single phase meter will be allowed to have up to a 5kW solar inverter connected.

 

SOLAR – POST INSTALL FAQs

43. Can I upsize my system later?

There are a few different options available to you if you’d like to upsize your solar system later. The one thing to be aware of is that there may be a pre-approval required from your electrcity distributor at the time of expansion and this may restrict what you are allowed to do.

As far as the actual expansion goes, here are your options:

  • You can install a larger inverter to begin with, so that when you go to expand it is just a matter of connecting more panels. One thing to be aware of here is that you may need to match the panels fairly closely to those in your original installation. If it is five years down the track, technology may have changed a little bit and it may be difficult to find a match.
  • You could just add another inverter next to your original system, when you go to expand, almost like a separate system.
  • The final option is to look at a microinverter system. With microinverters there is no central inverter unit, each panel has it’s own inverter, so these can normally be expanded in a modular fashion, one panels at a time.

Another thing to think about is where the extra panels will go, central string inverters will normally have some restrictions if you are wanting to face panels in different directions, microinverters can give you more flexibility here if this is needed.

 

44. How long does a system last?

If you buy a good quality system and it is maintained properly, it should still be working in 20+ years time. The inverter may need replacing over the life of the panels and some minor works may be required over that time period, but it is truly a long term investment for your property.

45. What are the warranties?

All the panels that we use come with a 10 year product warranty and a 25 year performance guarantee (stating that the panel will still put out 80% of it’s nameplate power rating after 25 years).

Our central string inverters (SMA and Aurora) have a five year warranty as standard, with options available to extend this to 10, 15, 20 & 25 years. Our Enphase microinverters come with a 10 year warranty as standard.

Finally Green Energy Options offer a five year workmanship warranty, covering any defects in the installation work that we’ve done.

46. Can I insure my solar system?

For Storm damage, fire and theft most insurer’s will allow you to put your solar system on your home and contents policy (some at no extra cost). We recommend contacting your insurer to look at what options are available to you.

47. Does Green Energy Options organise the grid connection?

Yes, we organise the grid connection paperwork and will send this off to your electricity retailer. Your electricity retailer will then forward on to your distributor. Note that the distributor can take up to 40 days to finalise your connection (in most cases it’s quicker than this). You will be charged separately through your electricity bill for this component, normally $300-400. We do recommend that it is worth following up with your electricity retailer to confirm feed in tariff arrangements and confirm connection costs a week or so after your installation.

48. Who organises the government incentive paperwork?

We organise all the paperwork around the STC incentive and process. Normally you sign over the right to create the STCs to Green Energy Options in exchange for a discount at the point of sale.

49. Is any maintenance required?

Solar PV systems are very low maintenance, however we do warn that they are not set and forget. If you expect the system to last 20+ years there will be a small amount of maintenance and cleaning required. We provide a full maintenance schedule with our user manual after installation.

50. How can I tell if my system is working properly?

The best way to see if your system is working properly is to compare the monthly breakdown of performance figures provided in the handover kit with the actual output on the inverter display or the monitoring system. If your system is under performing, give us a call and we can troubleshoot any potential problems.

 

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SOLAR SYSTEM COMPONENT FAQs

51. Microinverters vs central string inverters. Which is better?

At Green Energy Options we offer both the traditional string or central inverter and the newer microinverter options. We specialise in microinverters but believe that both systems are good options, as long as the components that are used are of a good quality. There may be one option that suits your situation better, depending on what you are looking for and how your roof is laid out.

String inverters have been around for a long time and will probably work out a bit cheaper than the microinverter option. While microinverters have a few advantages including:

  • Longer inverter warranty (10 years)
  • Online panel monitoring
  • Easy system expandability
  • More flexibility with layout
  • Improved performance (no weakest link series connections) particularly in shade
  • Improved safety (no high DC voltages)
  • No panel PID (Potential Induced Degradation) caused by high voltages

52. Where are the panels made?

We offer a range of different panels including panels manufactured in Singapore, China, Korea and Australia.

Note: Be careful if you are looking to purchase panels made in Germany, as many of the premium European manufacturers have moved their operations to Asia. There are a few “German & Australian Wallpaper” brands which hint at being German or Australian Made, but are made in China. There’s nothing wrong with Chinese made solar panels, we just think it’s important that customers aren’t mislead about the origin of the panels they are buying.

53. What different types of panels are available?

There are a few different types of solar panels commercially available in Australia. The most commonly used modules are Monocrystaline and Polycrystaline type panels. There are also a number of different thin film solar technologies and hybrid solutions available too. Here’s a brief overview.

Monocrystaline & Polycrystaline

We put these in the same basket, because they use they are made from the same type of silicon and their performance and physical characteristics are very similar. The manufacturing process is different for Mono’s and Poly’s, with monocrystaline cells being grown from a single crystal on a rod and polycrystaline cells being made from multiple crystals backed into an ingot. The mono cells appear a uniform dark blue in colour and are square with the corners cut off, forming small diamonds between the corners of the cells when they are made into a solar panels. The poly cells are square and are normally a lighter blue speckled colour.

When looking at the performance of each cell type, there isn’t much difference, with some good high performance mono panels available and some high performance poly panels available. There are other factors other than cell type that will define weather the panel is good  or not. We suggest you look at the panels temperature coefficient, positive tolerance details and independent testing results for a better indication of how the panel will perform.

We offer REC & DAQO panels which are both polycrystaline (also known as multicrystaline) modules. There are now a few high space efficient monocrystaline models becoming available, (generally at a higher cost). We  are offering the LG panels which are a space efficient monocrystaline panel, great if you have a restricted roof area.

Thin Film panels

There are a few different thin film panel types available in Australia. That are made using similar manufacturing processes but contain a number of different photovoltaic materials including:

  • Amorphous silicon
  • Copper, Indium, Gallium, Selenide (CIGS or CIS)
  • Cadmium Telluride (CdTe)
  • Microcrystaline
  • Dye sensitised or organic cells

Thin film Amorphous modules have been around for a while and are used quite widely in residential and commercial applications. CIGS are a newer thin film solution that have some great performance characteristics and a better space efficiency than amorphous silicone. Cadmium Telluride panels have been the leading option for large commercial systems over the past few years, due to their low cost, but include Cadmium which is considered a toxic material, so have not been so prevalent in residential installations. The organic thin film technologies although promising will generally have quite low efficiencies.

Thin film panels have some good characteristics, like low temperature coefficents and a higher tolerance to shading than crystaline, but they have recently suffered a setback, as the price of crystaline modules has come down dramatically over the past few years. Thin film panels take up more space than crystaline panels, and with the price of panels coming down, the additional costs for installation, racking hardware and balance of system costs, normally mean that a thin film system will be a more expensive option.

 

54. Transformer vs transformerless inverters?

The newer transformerless type inverters normally have a higher efficiency rating of around 1-2%. They are also lighter as they don’t include a heavy transformer (normally made from copper windings and a iron or steel core) and instead use electronic switching to create an Alternating Current (AC). Safety wise, transformerless inverters don’t have isolation between the DC and AC circuits, so may be considered a slightly higher safety risk.

The microinverters available on the market normally contain a transformer, where string inverters come in both transformer and transformerless types.

55. Where is the inverter located and what does it do?

A central or string inverter is normally mounted on an outside wall or on a wall inside a garage or shed, if possible close to the switchboard. The inverter provides a number of functions, but it’s main job is to turn the DC power generated by the solar panels into an AC power, which can be utilised by the appliances in your home. Most string inverters will have a display screen so that you can identify if there is a problem with your solar system and see how your system is performing.

If you have microinverters, these are located underneath the panels on the roof, they convert the AC to DC on the roof and also send system performance information back to an internet gateway, where it is uploaded onto a website.

56. What brands of panels do Green Energy Option use?

Green Energy Options have a few preferred panel options. We mainly use REC, DAQO and LG panels, but are also able to tailor a system if you have specific needs.

57. What inverter brands do Green Energy Options use?

Our preference is to stick with well known and high quality inverter manufacturers. We primarily use SMA, Aurora and Enphase inverters.

 

We hope you found our solar FAQ useful. If you would like more information, have any questions or would like to organise a time to catch up, please give us a call on 1300 931 929 or email on info@greenenergyoptions.com.au

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